Photography is a form of therapy for me

 

For most of my life, I lived in a left brain world. I used my analytic skills to survive and sometimes thrive.  I am a reasonable, logical problem-solver with a love for puzzles like Rubik's cube.  I work to hone my left brain capabilities every day because they keep me fed, helped me raise my three children and provided me with a modest home and lifestyle. 

The first time I recognized the need to develop my right brain was at Christmas gift exchange party during my early years at IBM.  My peers gave me an unusual present which I opened in front of the entire party. My gift was a mirror with a title, PROBLEM,  printed boldly at the top. When I looked in the mirror and read the title, I got their message. I was their problem.   It felt like a public lashing which hurt even more when the room broke out in laughter. The message was that even though I was a successful analyst, I had poor people skills and they did not like me.

I was shocked, embarrassed and hurt but tried to take the feedback with a smile. After some reflection, I decided to use my camera as a vehicle to build better rapport with people.  I took my camera on vacations and shot photograph around my neighborhood.  This strategy had an immediate return.  The camera helped me to relax when I approached people. It was an excuse to start a conversation. I would compliment people on how they looked and asked them to allow me to take their picture.  The camera got me out of my left brain shell and helped me to develop valuable life skills. 

Two unexpected consequences of this experiment were that my friends enjoyed my photographs, and I was also able to access both sides of my brain through photography.  I had a few exhibitions of my work at a local library and a nearby Junior College.  I opened these shows with lively parties where I invited friends to review my efforts. I accepted compliments about the praise for the high quality of my shots, and I even considered selling some of them.  My pictures not only allowed me to develop better people skills but also enabled me to think of myself as an artist. 

It is for these reasons; I want to share some of my recent photographs that I took with my new digital camera.  I took my older pictures with an analog camera, and it will take some time for me to get them in a digital form so that I can post them here. Many of these pictures, I took from my bedroom window on Saratoga Lake where I live now.  I hope you enjoy them, and I would love any comments you would like to share.